Calculation

At times it can be difficult to give children the chance to work at their own pace on mathematical activities. If the activity isn't pitched at the right level, or if it isn't engaging, the pace can fall and learning will be affected.

This is a common problem, which the majority of our mathsticks resources aims to solve. However, when we road tested this latest maths resource we were in for a shock. Read more »

Hindu Gods Top Trumps - maths multiplication game

Here's a very versatile idea from Jason Darley.

The set of 12 Top Trump cards all feature Hindu Gods. The cards have numerical ratings for each of the Gods abilities - Power, Beauty, Avatars... etc.

They can be used in any normal Top Trump style game. Read more »

Multiplying - mental and oral starter

How do you keep mental mathematics interesting? ...How do you engage children in 'estimating'? ...How do you make calculator work meaningful?

These are all vital questions, and finding appropriate solutions can become increasingly difficult the further into Key Stage 2 you teach! Read more »

Bingo Bonds Maths GameHere's a fun reverse bingo game... I call it 'reverse' because the Bingo Boards the children use all feature written subtraction problems, such as ‘50 – 32’ or ‘50 – 19’. Read more »

probability - digit card gameThis is a straightforward number game for 2-4 players. You need 4 sets of 0-9 digit cards, a sand timer (or stopwatch) and individual whiteboards (or notepaper). Read more »

school mathematics and magicThere are hundreds of versions of "Think of a Number..." tricks. This one is perfect for Friday 13th. When I used it some years ago, the children wanted to know how it was done, not just to satisfy their curiosity, but so they could share it with their families. The wanted to enjoy using the 'secret'. So there's motivation in the magic.

Of course, simply telling how a number trick works is fine for some children, but for most it is the problem solving opportunities that are important. Read more »

This resource consists of 100 cards grouped into pairs of numbers which sum to 100.

Print and cut out some or all of the cards - you may, for example, only choose to use specific pairs of numbers:


10-90, 20-80, 30-70... or
9-91, 19-81, 29-71... or
1-99, 11-89, 21-79... for example
Read more »