Gattegno Chart

Gattegno place value chartThe Gattegno (or Place Value) Chart is a simple tool to help children appreciate the  patterns in our counting structure. For example, the identical pattern evident when counting in 1’s, 10’s, 100’s, 1000’s... or greater

To familiarise young children with the Gattegno Chart ask them to:

  • use the chart to count in 1's  forwards and backwards - pointing to the 1's row on the chart.
  • choose any single digit number and use that as a starting point for countin up to 9, and then back to 1
  • count in 10's forwards and backwards along the 10's row.
  • choose any multiple of 10 as a starting point and to count up and down again.

You can repeat this as necessary, asking the children to talk about the similarities (and the differences) in the language they use when counting when counting like this..

To further aid familiarisation (or as an assessment activity) you can point to different sections of the chart and ask children to say the name of the number (e.g. "Twenty", "Two hundred, "Nine", etc.).

When they are familiar with the layout and use of the chart children can use it to further increase their understanding of place value. For example: children can create numbers by pointing. Place a finger on 30 and another on 7 to make 37.

Use small counters or paperclips to note other numbers – a counter on each of the following three numbers: 200, 50 and 4 creates 254, for example.

Childern should also be encouraged to demonstrate similar calculations, for example:

If  4 + 5 = 9
then  40 + 50 + 90
and  400 + 500 = 900
etc...
 

The downloadable* pdf file includes three Gattegno Charts:two of which feature 1, 10, 100, 1000 numbers (in different fonts); and one which extends the idea (for older children) to include numbers to two decimal places: 0.01, 0.1, 1, 10, 100, 1000

place value - Gattegno Chart

As a side note: Caleb Gattegno insisted that teaching should be subordinated to learning; that teachers must understand how people learn, and (rather than present facts for memorization) they should construct challenges for students to conquer. "If the student cannot conquer the challenge easily, the teacher does not tell the answer, but observes and asks questions to determine where the confusion lies, and what awareness needs to be triggered in the student."

The Gattegno Chart is a perfect example of a resource underpinned by this philosophy. Further information about Gattegno can be found here [Caleb Gattegno].

 


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JudyRamshaw's picture

Thank you for this useful

Thank you for this useful resource - well presented and child friendly.  I will be using it to advise teachers on using the Gattegno Chart to develop fluency with place value and calculations.  
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Judithrenton's picture

I work in Year 6, with a

I work in Year 6, with a small group of children who find maths hard for a variety of reasons...hoping this will really help their understanding of number and decimals. Thank you.
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I'm currently on the Maths

I'm currently on the Maths Specialist Teacher Programme and was told about these charts in one of my lectures. Have been teaching 10 years and never heard of them! So pleased I found these as they are an effective way to teach place value. I will be using them with my class in year two, but giving copies to the upper school too. So much scope. Excellent!
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angiemull's picture

  I have downloaded this

  I have downloaded this resource several times as it is my most favourite! The children find it easy to use and the characters just make it a bit more fun for them; they enjoy it so much I don't think they realise they are actually working!  
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johdu's picture

That's brilliant. Thanks for

That's brilliant. Thanks for the feedback.

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alexcurran's picture

Thank you for this awesome

Thank you for this awesome resource - clearly presented, extremely helpful.
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aculshaw's picture

 Excellent- My class will

 Excellent- My class will love the characters on these cards but more importantly, a great visual aid in teaching tenths and hundredths and the realationship with the units, tens etc.. Thanks
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aculshaw's picture

 Excellent- My class will

 Excellent- My class will love the characters on these cards but more importantly, a great visual aid in teaching tenths and hundredths and the realationship with the units, tens etc.. Thanks
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amb58's picture

Wow just what I was looking

Wow just what I was looking for .Thanks.
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gempy85's picture

Great resource! I was shown

Great resource! I was shown one of these charts on a numeracy course but couldn't find a child friendly version anywhere - thanks!
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myusername's picture

Hi- I am really pleased to

Hi- I am really pleased to have found this friendly looking chart. Thank you! I already have a large one up on the wall, but yours will be great to have on the desks. Would you make another one which goes from 0.01 into the tens of thousands please?
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johdu's picture

That's a great idea. I'm sure

That's a great idea. I'm sure it is something we can work on.Thanks for the feedback.  
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dbyers@stmichaelscemidd.rochdale.sch.uk's picture

Love using these with the

Love using these with the class as a warm up to maths.  
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ajohnstone's picture

I'm so excited I stumbled on

I'm so excited I stumbled on this site this morning - The resources will help me differentiate my math lessons and present material we are covering in different ways.  Can't wait to use this chart with some of my kids struggling to grasp the patterns in the place value system!
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carolinecameron's picture

 Great looking, friendly

 Great looking, friendly charts. Going to use mine in an extension activity with a year 4 child. 
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collosopede's picture

Great - attractive and

Great - attractive and differentiated. Not quite sure why there are three though... (what's the difference between the first and second?) Useful to go to three dp for Y6 if you revise later.
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johdu's picture

The first and second Gattegno

The first and second Gattegno chart have different fonts. The first one should have the primary font (usually used with younger children) with the 'open' number 4. However if they look the same for you it's becasue the acrobat reader cannot find the font file on you computer. If you don't have it (and want it) you can get a version from here:

 http://www.urbanfonts.com/fonts/Primer_Print_Bold.htm

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 More "child-friendly" than

 More "child-friendly" than the version I currently have - more appealing graphics :)
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johdu's picture

That's good to hear. We pride

That's good to hear. We pride ourselves on producing maths resources that "Look Good", as well as Doing Good! I firmly believe that if the resource doesn't look appealing (especially for young learners) the children will quickly lose interest. After all, we expect the best from them - shouldn't we give them the best in return?
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obeseparrot's picture

 Handy for place value. Never

 Handy for place value. Never knew it was called a Gattengo chart.
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kpo11's picture

WOW... what a life saver, I

WOW... what a life saver, I have not seen one like this before and I am looking forward to using this with my class tomorrow. I really think this is going to make a huge difference in enchancing their understanding of numbers in so many different ways...exciting!!  
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Slinkywin01's picture

Looks more 'student friendly'

Looks more 'student friendly' [with the graphics] than the plain version I already had on file. Pleased yours covers decimal places as well as whole numbers, too. Thanks!
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lucieburgess1's picture

I heard about Gattegno charts

I heard about Gattegno charts from a colleague and these are nicely presented for children! Can't wait to use these in class!
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angelamann's picture

 I have one of these charts

 I have one of these charts from Coventry LEA (I didn't know this was what they're called though!) and have used it often with years 5 and 6. This though, is perfect for target work planned next term for my current year threes - simplified and colourful: they'll love it!
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johdu's picture

Thanks for your feedback,

Thanks for your feedback, It's good to hear that the design and style of this chart is useful.
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Ferguteach's picture

Excited to have found such a

Excited to have found such a great site!  Looking forward to trying this resource and many others...
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Hoping someone posts about

Hoping someone posts about using this with decimals. I think I'll start by expalining the whole number portion.... maybe I'll understand how to relate that to decimals a bit better then.
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young67's picture

Thank you for a clear and

Thank you for a clear and concise resource.
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hannahwalsh's picture

This is the most

This is the most child-friendly version I have ever seen! wonderful!
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lillywilko's picture

Thank you for this useful

Thank you for this useful resource. I will be using it as a visual prompt for teaching multiplication and division by 10. It will also provide a talking point regarding the importance of putting each digit in the right place for column addition.
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